War Room Review

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This was shown at the church we are attending. War Room is fifth movie from the Kendrick brothers, movie-making ministers at Sherwood Baptist Church; their other movies include “Fireproof” and “Facing the Giants.”

The movie’s premise essentially hammers home the message that it’s  incumbent upon the believer’s works in order for God to act. Nothing going your way? Husband about to cheat? [Etc. etc.] Well you better get down on your knees, sister because, well, the reason God isn’t intervening in your life? Well, you’re just not praying enough. As if God needs us to do anything in order for Him to do everything.

Guess the Fundies loved the premise of this movie, though, as I note on IMDB.com that this movie grossed, as of the end of December, 2015, over 67,000,000. It’s the top grossing evangelical movie ever. [The Kendrick’s previous movies also grossed in the millions.]

What would the Kendrick’s say to the pastor and his wife who lost two of their children?  To the friends we have who lost their adult son? To us, who prayed for my father in law when he was ill (he passed away last fall)? To my praying husband, who’s been without work since the end of November, 2015? “Well, you just weren’t praying enough.” I CALL UTTER B.S.   Prayer doesn’t function like some magic genie – rub the genie and your wishes are granted.

Although these days I’m finding it difficult to figure out exactly what prayer does do in my life.  Prayer? Can’t hurt, might help, I guess. Other people’s prayers are seemingly answered or at least God’s given the credit when things work out.

As an aside, things seem pretty hush-hush however when it comes to distribution of all those greenbacks. So, where does all the money go? Is some of it given to the poor? Scholarships set up for kids too poor to go to University? Syrian refugees sponsored? Food banks started? Missionaries sponsored overseas? Or does it all go to finance a uber-wealthy lifestyle for the Kendricks? Wouldn’t be the first time pastors lived high on the hog.

My Own “Coming Out”

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On #dayofpink I’m coming out. As a believing Christian who’s welcoming. and non-homophobic. I’m coming out as a Christian who’s proud to #wearpink to celebrate diversity. I’m also coming out as one who has both been bullied as a teen, and, regrettably, been part of a group in elementary school who bullied another person.

I’m tired of Fundie Christians bashing the LGBTQ community. Jesus loved them, why can’t we?

I’m nervous about pushing publish on this post.  What will the ramifications be? Negative or positive? Haters gonna hate I guess.

Tiptoeing and Whispering through Taber

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An outrageous new bylaw has recently been passed in the town of Taber, Alberta. Taber Law

This law prohibits spitting (and other bodily fluid disposal) in public areas. If caught, it’s $75 a spit; other bodily fluids are more costly. Yelling  and, dammit, swearing are also prohibited; even whispering a ‘swear’ can net you up to a $250 fine. Further, this bylaw states that no more than three people may assemble together at any one time (guess that cancels their annual corn festival; may lead to rabble-rousing). There’s also provision for noise with no noise allowed between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m.. This noise bylaw includes the operation of a motor vehicle and, from my reading of that section, offers no noise exemption for emergency vehicles;if you live in Taber, better hope your house doesn’t start on fire in the middle of the night; the fire truck won’t be able to deploy their emergency sirens to get to your house.   Of course, with this new bylaw, streets will be empty at night, and no siren will be necessary.

Welcome to Taber, the new  Bomont, Georgia (the fictitious town in the movie “Footloose” ). In this town, however, unlike Bomont, not even Kevin Bacon can save you.

Not Quite Welcoming

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We participated in a book club discussion recently at church that discussed the book “Welcoming but not Affirming, an Evangelical Response to Homosexuality”.  That discussion sure revealed there were two camps in our church body:

Book Club Discussion, Camp Number One:

The fundies, who believe “sure homosexuals can come in the door, but oh no, they can’t  become members” (so, only so “welcoming” I guess). However, cynical me says these same fundies are probably happy to take their financial offerings!   Anyways , to continue,the fundies in our midst that morning further thought that once a homosexual set foot inside our church, we should descend on them like a pack of wolves to try and turn them from their “gayness”, including, but not limited to, forcing a Christian, committed, gay couple – even a gay couple who was abstinent – to live apart. To which I responded that was a non-starter if that’s the first thing we do the minute a homosexual enters our midst, they will walk out the door and never return.

 

(I suspect these same fundies would force a heterosexual couple who started attending our church and who were living together – whether they had children from that union or not – to move into separate dwellings until they married. And membership? Well, forget that.   That’s right, rip a family apart.)

 

“He who is without sin let him cast the first stone.”

 

But I Digress..On To …

Book Club Discussion, Camp Number Two:

The second camp – the one we were in (which was a pretty lonely place, just my husband and I and maybe one other person) – believed, as the author of the book seemed to state, that we are to come alongside homosexuals and love them and accept them and let God /Jesus/Holy Spirit sort out the rest.
Thanks to said discussion, we contemplated revoking our church membership.
Sigh.
We have been a part of that church community for approximately ten years. Leaving anything one has been a part of for that long — be it church, job, a relationship, or a community — is not any easy decision to make, yet is one we are contemplating.
Nonetheless, at the moment our decision is to stay, to continue to help out in small ways, attend occasionally, and discontinue going to church meetings. I believe in our food distribution program our church has for example, and have taken a larger role in that recently.
We feel like we don’t belong anywhere, church wise.  It’s clear we don’t fit in with the fundies (which is most of our current church) because we are quite progressive, and yet we are not quite liberal enough in our beliefs to attend other churches.
Rock, meet hard place.
Jesus loves all, accepts all, died for all, and rose for all.  Both those who identify as insiders (i.e. believers) and those who identify as  outsiders (non-believers). Isn’t it time to end the “us vs. them” mentality so prevalent in Christian circles?
All means all, people. Wouldn’t it be nice if this Easter if the fundies could finally get that?